California has adopted 100+ housing laws since 2017, promising “affordability.”

Most housing laws benefit developers, banks or investors.

California has adopted 100+ housing laws since 2017, promising “affordability.”

 Fred Keeley, one of the most respected ex-legislators in California, former treasurer for Santa Cruz County, and now a popular professor at San Jose State. He will walk us through the failing efforts by the State Capitol to house low-income and working-class Californians, and what success would look like.

Professor Keeley will touch on why:

  • The endless dramatic housing laws produced by the State Capitol will not produce or fuel low-income housing in our cities, bills such as SB 35, SB 9 and SB 10.

  • But one standout legislator, California Senate Majority Leader Bob Hertzberg, has an answer: a $25B bond measure to do just that.

  • How state lawmakers’ failing belief system, that market-rate housing will somehow trickle-down to low-income families, has put California years behind. But the bond measure could catch us up.

The state is once again unleashing new 2022 laws aimed against homeowners, the environment and the state’s working class even as it hands California over to Wall Street investors.

California has adopted 100+ housing laws since 2017, promising “affordability.” Instead, most laws benefit developers, banks or investors. Very, very few help affordable housing.